The Most Common Questions About Hepatitis

Questions About Hepatitis

Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type of hepatitis is named for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B orhepatitis C. Drug or alcohol use can also cause hepatitis.

If you develop hepatitis C symptoms soon after infection, you might also have these symptoms: nausea or vomiting. stomach pain. joint or muscle pain.
Hepatitis B may scar the liver (cirrhosis) and lead to liver cancer. Hepatitis C: Formerly known as “non-A, non-B hepatitis,” hepatitis C is the most common form ofviral hepatitis.
Hepatitis refers to an inflammatory condition of the liver. It’s commonly caused by aviral infection, but there are other possible causes of hepatitis. These includeautoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis that occurs as a secondary result of medications, drugs, toxins, and alcohol.
You can get it through contact with the blood or body fluids of an infected person. In the U.S., it’s most often spread through unprotected sex. It’s also possible to get hepatitis B by sharing an infected person’s needles, razors, or toothbrush. And an infected mother can pass the virus to her baby during childbirth.
Hepatitis B signs and symptoms may include:
  • Abdominal pain.
  • Dark urine.
  • Fever.
  • Joint pain.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Weakness and fatigue.
  • Yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice)
Hepatitis B (HBV) is 50 to 100 times easier to transmit sexually than HIV ( the virus that causes AIDS). HBV has been found in vaginal secretions, saliva, and semen.Oral sex and especially anal sex, whether it occurs in a heterosexual or homosexual context, are possible ways of transmitting the virus.
While HE won’t kill you, it can lead to brain fog and you might make a poor choice that could jeopardize your life. Overall, the hepatitis C virus takes a toll on your body and can lead to death.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that up to 1 out of 4 people who contract the hepatitis C virus will eventually be cured from the condition without treatment. For these people, hepatitis C will be a short-term acute condition that goes away without treatment.
The virus can‘t be transmitted through casual contact, such as sharing a cup or eating utensils with an infected person. Hugging, holding hands, and kissing also won’t spread it. You can‘t catch the virus from someone with hepatitis C sneezing or coughing on you.
Which Is WorseHepatitis B or Hepatitis C? Chronic hepatitis B infection was associated with higher liver-related mortality. Chronic hepatitis B and chronichepatitis C virus infections are both potentially fatal conditions, but few head-to-head comparisons of clinical outcomes have been attempted.
Treatment. There is no specific treatment capable of altering the course of acutehepatitis E. As the disease is usually self-limiting, hospitalization is generally not required. Hospitalization is required for people with fulminant hepatitis, however, and should also be considered for symptomatic pregnant women.
Bed rest, abstaining from alcohol, and taking medication to help relieve symptoms. Most people who have hepatitis A and E get well on their own after a few weeks. Hepatitis B is treated with drugs, such as lamivudine and adefovir dipivoxil. Hepatitis C is treated with a combination of peginterferon and ribovarin.
“About 85 percent of hepatitis C infections lead to chronic liver disease,” Gulati says. “The virus causes slowly progressing, but ultimately devastating damage to the liver.” Both hepatitis A and B also can be dangerous. “Hepatitis A virus can cause acute liver disease, but can heal within a few months.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that up to 1 out of 4 people who contract the hepatitis C virus will eventually be cured from the condition without treatment. For these people, hepatitis C will be a short-term acute condition that goes away without treatment.
Viruses cause most hepatitis. Viral hepatitis is the most common cause of liver disease in the world. … Vaccines protect against hepatitis A and B. No vaccines are available for hepatitis C, D, and E. Hepatitis B, C, and D can cause long-lasting problems, including liver scarring (cirrhosis) and cancer.
Hepatitis B (HBV) is 50 to 100 times easier to transmit sexually than HIV ( the virus that causes AIDS). HBV has been found in vaginal secretions, saliva, and semen. Oral sex and especially anal sex, whether it occurs in a heterosexual or homosexual context, are possible ways of transmitting the virus.
Symptoms may include tiredness, loss of appetite, stomach discomfort and yellow skin. The virus is found in blood, semen, vaginal fluids and saliva. Hepatitis B is the only sexually transmitted disease that has a safe and effective vaccine to protect against infection.
It normally takes 20 to 30 years for people with chronic hepatitis C to develop cirrhosis. About 5 to 20 percent of people with chronic HCV will develop cirrhosis. Without treatment, cirrhosis can lead to liver cancer and liver failure.
The benchmark of Hepatitis C treatment, a sustained virologic response (SVR) is as close as we can get to a cure for this disease. SVR is declared if the person’s viral load is non-detectable six months after administration of the last dose of HepatitisC medication. … SVR means the virus is probably permanently gone.
Many people live with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) without even knowing they have it.Hepatitis C, caused by HCV, damages the liver. About 15 to 25 percent of people with the virus clear it without treatment. This is called acute HCV and is rarely associated with life-threatening conditions.
Hepatitis B may scar the liver (cirrhosis) and lead to liver cancer. Hepatitis C: Formerly known as “non-A, non-B hepatitis,” hepatitis C is the most common form ofviral hepatitis.
However, the majority of people infected with HCV have “chronic” hepatitis C—an infection that can stay with them for life unless they are treated. … Between 1 and 5 out of 100 hepatitis C infections will die from the consequences of chronic HCV infection, notably liver cancer or liver failure.
There’s currently no cure for hepatitis A, but it will normally pass on its own within a couple of months. You can usually look after yourself at home. However, it’s still a good idea to see your GP for a blood test if you think you could have hepatitis A, as more serious conditions can have similar symptoms.
Hepatitis B is not spread through sneezing, coughing, hugging, or breastfeeding. Although the virus can be found in saliva, it is not believed to be spread throughkissing or sharing utensils. Yes. … In addition, the vaccine is recommended for anyone who has never been infected and is at risk for getting Hepatitis B.
There are no confirmed reports of hepatitis B infection resulting from oral sex, but there’s still a risk for infection. … And don’t forget, other sexually-transmitted infections such as chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis are spread through oral sex.
Infectious hepatitis that is contagious also may be spread by sexual contact. Other types of viral hepatitis like hepatitis A are spread by fecal/oral contamination, and contaminated food, water, or items touched by infected individuals.
Symptoms will go away in a few weeks to months if your body is able to fight off the infection. Some people never get rid of the HBV. This is called chronic hepatitis B. … Over time, they may develop symptoms of liver damage and cirrhosis of the liver.
It can cause scarring of the organ, liver failure, and cancer. It can be fatal if it isn’t treated. It’s spread when people come in contact with the blood, open sores, or body fluids of someone who has the hepatitis B virus. It’s serious, but if you get the disease as an adult, it shouldn’t last a long time.
Hepatitis E generally clears up on its own with few complications. In rare cases, it can lead to acute liver failure, which can be fatal. Mortality rates for the virus are low.
Treatment. There is no specific treatment capable of altering the course of acutehepatitis E. As the disease is usually self-limiting, hospitalization is generally not required. Hospitalization is required for people with fulminant hepatitis, however, and should also be considered for symptomatic pregnant women.
Hepatitis E infection usually only causes a short-term illness which will go away by itself in a few weeks. However, while you are infected, it can make you severely ill. Rarely, hepatitis E develops into a very severe disease that is fatal in about 2% of cases.
When a chronic infection occurs, it can cause cirrhosis, or scarring of the liver, over time. … Dangerous outcomes like severe liver damage, liver cancer, and liver failurecan also occur. A blood test can measure HCV antibodies in your bloodstream. If you have antibodies it means you‘ve been exposed to the virus.
Eat a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables, exercise regularly, and get enough sleep. Take care of your liver. Don’t drink alcohol or take prescription or over-the-counter drugs without consulting your doctor. Get tested for hepatitis A and C. Get vaccinated for hepatitis A if you haven’t been exposed.
Most adults will recover from an acute hepatitis B infection without treatment. If the virus has been in the blood for more than 6 months, it is considered a permanent (or chronic) hepatitis B infection.
Acute hepatitis B, if left untreated, can develop into chronic (long-term) hepatitis B, which is more difficult to manage and can lead to liver failure, liver cancer and even death.
Hepatitis B is incurable. A safe, effective vaccine has been available since the 1980s. Vaccination can help protect individuals and contribute to the elimination of this highly infectious disease. In the US, up to 2.2 million individuals have chronic HBV infection.
There is no formal treatment for hepatitis A. Because it’s a short-term viral infection that goes away on its own, treatment is typically focused on reducing your symptoms. After a few weeks of rest, the symptoms of hepatitis A usually begin to improve.
Sexual transmission is considered low, but it has been recorded, especially among men who have sex with men. If you are in fact stuck by an infected syringe or needle at a medical clinic, the chances of contracting hep C are still only about 1.8 percent.
It can stay in the liver for a long time, possibly even a lifetime. Although those with chronic hepatitis B infection live with an increased risk of developing liver disease later in life, many should expect to live long and healthy lives.
Which Is WorseHepatitis B or Hepatitis C? Chronic hepatitis B infection was associated with higher liver-related mortality. Chronic hepatitis B and chronichepatitis C virus infections are both potentially fatal conditions, but few head-to-head comparisons of clinical outcomes have been attempted.
The virus can‘t be transmitted through casual contact, such as sharing a cup or eating utensils with an infected person. Hugging, holding hands, and kissing also won’t spread it. You can‘t catch the virus from someone with hepatitis C sneezing or coughing on you.
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a virus that causes inflammation of the liver. Most people do not think of hepatitis as a sexually transmitted infection; however, one of the more common modes of the spread of viral hepatitis B is through intimate sexual contact.
Men are less able than women to fight off the hepatitis C virus once they’ve been infected. According to studies, men have consistently lower clearance rates thanwomen. … whether he has other infections, such as HIV. the route of infection, such as a blood transfusion, sexual contact, or drug use.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that up to 1 out of 4 people who contract the hepatitis C virus will eventually be cured from the condition without treatment. For these people, hepatitis C will be a short-term acute condition that goes away without treatment.
There’s no cure for hepatitis B. The good news is it usually goes away by itself in 4 to 8 weeks. … Most carriers are contagious — meaning they can spread hepatitis B— for the rest of their lives. Hepatitis B infections that last a long time may lead to serious liver diseases like cirrhosis and liver cancer.
The benchmark of Hepatitis C treatment, a sustained virologic response (SVR) is as close as we can get to a cure for this disease. SVR is declared if the person’s viral load is non-detectable six months after administration of the last dose of HepatitisC medication. … SVR means the virus is probably permanently gone.
Many people live with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) without even knowing they have it.Hepatitis C, caused by HCV, damages the liver. About 15 to 25 percent of people with the virus clear it without treatment. This is called acute HCV and is rarely associated with life-threatening conditions.

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Written by STDsSTIs

STDsSTIs is here to help people think, discuss and take responsible action on some of life’s biggest decisions – ones that often don’t get enough attention. We help raise the tough questions and ask young people to consider what really makes sense for them. Together, we can help Coloradans lead healthier lives and raise healthier families.

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