The Most Common Questions About Bacterial Vaginosis

Questions About Bacterial Vaginosis

Bacterial vaginosis tends to affect women of childbearing age. Activities that change the balance of bacteria in the vagina, such as sexual intercourse or frequent douching, can increase a person’s risk.

In some cases, there are no symptoms. In other cases, there may be abnormal vaginal discharge, itching, or odor. Treatment can include prescription cream, gel, or medication. Recurrence within three to 12 months is common, requiring additional treatment.

Bacterial vaginosis is not the same thing as an STD or yeast infection. Bacterial vaginosis is not dangerous, but it can cause disturbing symptoms. Any woman with an unusual discharge should be evaluated so that more serious infections such as Chlamydia and gonorrhea can be excluded.
  • Vaginal discharge that may be white or gray in color.
  • Discharge with a strong, foul odor.
  • Vaginal odor that is particularly strong, with a fishy smell after sex.
  • Vaginal itching.
  • Painful or burning urination.
There are different ways to use tea tree oil to treat bacterial vaginosis, including mixing it with coconut oil (or another carrier oil) and soaking a tampon in it. Insert the tampon into the vagina and remove it after an hour. Remove it sooner if there is any irritation. Repeat this a few times per day.
Bacterial vaginosis is usually a mild problem that may go away on its own in a few days. But it can lead to more serious problems. So it’s a good idea to see your doctor and get treatment.
Bacterial vaginosis isn’t a sexually transmitted infection. But having sex with a new partner, or multiple partners, may increase your risk for BV. And sex sometimes leads to BV if your partner’s natural genital chemistry changes the balance in your vagina and causes bacteria to grow.
Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a mild infection in the vagina. … BV is the most common vaginal infection affecting young women. Although it’s not considered a sexually transmitted disease (STD), the chances of developing bacterial vaginosis seem to increase with the number of sexual partners a woman has.
If you don’t have any symptoms and aren’t pregnant, you may not need treatment. Your BV may go away on its own. When you do have symptoms, your doctor canprescribe antibiotics to get rid of your infection.
Semen is alkaline and often women find they notice a fishy smell after having sex. This is because the vagina wants to be slightly acidic, but if it’s knocked out of balance by the alkaline semen, and it can trigger BV. But BV doesn’t have to be a problem.
Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal infection. … The most common symptom of BV is a foul-smelling, fishy odor coming from the vagina. Some women also experience itching, burning, or an unusual gray discharge. Antibiotics can treat most cases of BV.
Your BV may go away on its own. When you do have symptoms, your doctor can prescribe antibiotics to get rid of your infection. … And you should finish all of yourmedicine, even if your symptoms go awayIf you stop early, your infection could come back.
Probiotics encourage the body to grow the “good” bacteria that help fight off the “bad” bacteria. Eating foods full of probiotics like yogurt and/or taking a probiotic supplement might help your BV. Rinse with apple cider vinegar. Apple cider vinegar may help balance the pH of your vagina.
Antibiotics kill the problem bacteria causing bacterial vaginosis symptoms. But symptoms often come back after antibiotic treatment. For some women, bacterial vaginosis goes away without treatment. But when it does not go away even with treatment, bacterial vaginosis is frustrating and troublesome.
There’s no way for men to get BV. However, experts aren’t as sure about whethermen can spread BV to female partners. … But sexually active women do have a higher risk of developing bacterial vaginosis. Women are also more likely to developBV when having sex with women.
Is there a cure for bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Yes, BV is usually curable with prescription antibiotics that can help readjust the balance of bacteria in the vagina. Although some over-the-counter vaginal medications are sold, these are not effective for curing BV. Currently, only prescribed antibiotics are effective.
So, while you can get it even without being sexually activea BV infection can make you more vulnerable to STDs if you do become sexually active. More than 80 percent of people with BV have no symptoms at all.
Many have no symptoms, and some mistake their symptoms for another infection, such as a yeast infection. The most common symptom of BV is a foul-smelling, fishy odor coming from the vagina. Some women also experience itching, burning, or an unusual gray discharge. Antibiotics can treat most cases of BV.
Most often, BV does not cause other health problems. However, if left untreatedBVmay increase your risk for: Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) like herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and HIV. Pelvic inflammatory disease where BV bacteria infect the uterus or fallopian tubes.
However, a delayed or irregular period could also be the sign of an illness. … PCOScan cause you to miss your period, or on the other end of the spectrum, it can cause extremely heavy and irregular periods.
BV and Periods. Unfortunately, our periods can sometimes act as a trigger forBacterial Vaginosis. … However, menstruation for seven days or more can make our vaginas less acidic. And a healthy vagina needs to be slightly acidic to control thegrowth of micro-organisms that can cause infections such as BV.
Hydrogen peroxide to treat BV. Another popular home treatment is douching with an over-the-counter hydrogen peroxide solution. This can cause a couple of problems. First, hydrogen peroxide is essentially a disinfectant and will potentially kill good bacteria as well as the ones causing the infection.
Trichomoniasis — a sexually transmitted infection — also can lead to vaginal odor.Chlamydia and gonorrhea infections usually don’t cause vaginal odors. Neither doyeast infections. Generally, if you have vaginal odor without other vaginal symptoms, it’s unlikely that your vaginal odor is abnormal.
This odor is most often attributed to bacterial vaginosis, a type of infection. It’s also a lot stronger than a normal period smell. You may have bacterial vaginosis if the“fishy” smell is accompanied by: … vaginal discharge outside of menstrualbleeding.
To treat bacterial vaginosis, your doctor may prescribe one of the following medications: Metronidazole (Flagyl, Metrogel-Vaginal, others). This medicine may be taken as a pill by mouth (orally). Metronidazole is also available as a topical gel that you insert into your vagina.
Bacterial vaginosis is usually a mild problem that may go away on its own in a few days. But it can lead to more serious problems. So it’s a good idea to see your doctor and get treatment.
BV and Periods. Unfortunately, our periods can sometimes act as a trigger forBacterial Vaginosis. … However, menstruation for seven days or more can make our vaginas less acidic. And a healthy vagina needs to be slightly acidic to control the growth of micro-organisms that can cause infections such as BV.
Apple cider vinegar for BV. Natural healers suggest treating BV with apple cider vinegar. … According to a 2017 article, ACV was effective in curing vaginal candida infection. Evidence from a 2016 study suggests lactic acid-based treatments may offer some benefit in BV treatment, and ACV contains lactic acid.
Your BV may go away on its own. When you do have symptoms, your doctor can prescribe antibiotics to get rid of your infection. This could be a tablet you take by mouth or a cream or gel you apply to your vagina. You’ll need to take most treatments for 5 to 7 days.
Known as Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GR-1) and Lactobacillus reuteri (RC-14), these probiotics show powerful effects in preventing and fighting bacterial and fungalvaginal infections.
Uncomplicated cases of bacterial vaginosis (BV) typically resolve after the standard antibiotic treatmentBV that does not resolve after one course of treatment may be cured by a second course with the same agent.
BV can be treated and cured with antibiotics. Finish all of your medicine to be sure you are cured. … Male partners do not need to be treated for BV, but BV may spread between women who have sex with women. This means that if you have BV and you have a female sex partner, your partner may have BV too.
If you don’t have any symptoms and aren’t pregnant, you may not need treatment. Your BV may go away on its own. When you do have symptoms, your doctor canprescribe antibiotics to get rid of your infection. … Even after BV is treated and goes away, it’s common for it to return.
Yes, BV is usually curable with prescription antibiotics that can help readjust the balance of bacteria in the vagina. Although some over-the-counter vaginal medications are sold, these are not effective for curing BV. … Although BV can becured, it does carry certain risks.
This depends. Women who are not sexually active may develop BV or yeast infections. … Trichomoniasis, on the other hand, is sexually transmitted and it will be important for sex partners to be treated, so it is not passed back and forth. It is important for partners to be treated even if they do not show any symptoms.
Your BV may go away on its own. When you do have symptoms, your doctor can prescribe antibiotics to get rid of your infection. … And you should finish all of yourmedicine, even if your symptoms go awayIf you stop early, your infection could come back.
Yes, BV is usually curable with prescription antibiotics that can help readjust the balance of bacteria in the vagina. Although some over-the-counter vaginal medications are sold, these are not effective for curing BV. Currently, only prescribed antibiotics are effective.

What do you think?

1001 points
Upvote Downvote

Written by STDsSTIs

STDsSTIs is here to help people think, discuss and take responsible action on some of life’s biggest decisions – ones that often don’t get enough attention. We help raise the tough questions and ask young people to consider what really makes sense for them. Together, we can help Coloradans lead healthier lives and raise healthier families.

Leave a Reply